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The Cuomo College Fiasco

Donald Trump sets the bar very high, but the award for the worst public policy idea of the year goes to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Cuomo presides over a state with a rich diversity of educational institutions. But he also presides over a state, like all states, where many students don't complete college and where many are unprepared for the information economy. For example, fewer than half of the African American and Hispanic students in New York public colleges graduate within six years.

Cuomo could have done many things to improve New York's higher ed system. He could have poured all available money into the Tuition Assistance Program, which is directed at poorer students. He could have spent more to help students become academically ready for college, which is the biggest barrier to graduation. He could have done more to help students pay room and board expenses. He could have massively improved overstretched mental health services. He could have massively improved career counseling.

But in 2016 Bernie Sanders made a big splash on the campaign trail with a plan to make college "free." So Cuomo proposed and last week signed legislation to make tuition free at New York public colleges for anybody coming from a family making no more than $100,000 a year, with the cap rising to $125,000 in 2019.

If he runs for president, this will be an outstanding talking point. Unfortunately, the law will hurt actual New Yorkers.

First, the law is regressive. It does nothing to help students from families earning less than $50,000 a year. Their tuition is already covered by other programs. But it does pay for tuition for New Yorkers who make double the state's median income. The higher up the income scale you go, until the ceiling, the more you benefit.

Second, it doesn't make a dent in reducing the non-tuition fees like living expenses, textbooks and travel, which for many students are far more onerous than tuition.

Third, it doesn't cover students who don't go to school full time and don't complete in four years. In 2017 this is the vast majority of all students, especially poorer students.

Fourth, it demotivates students. Research has shown that students who have to work to pay some college costs, even if only small expenses, are more spurred to work hard and graduate. As Northwestern researcher Chenny Ng put it in a Washington Post essay, "as the cost of attending college drops to zero, so does the perceived cost of dropping out."

Fifth, Cuomo's law threatens to destroy some of New York's private colleges. Cuomo could have championed a Pell-like program that subsidizes attendance at any accredited school. Instead, he pays for tuition only at state schools.

This means that suddenly the state's 150 private colleges have to compete with "free." Many of these schools are already struggling to survive. If upper-middle-class students are drawn away to public colleges, private ones may close. That hurts the state's educational diversity, destroys jobs, and hurts the state.

(These private colleges tend to have smaller classes, tend to do a better job of graduating their students, and tend to spend heavily to subsidize poorer students.)

Sixth, the law may widen the gap between rich and poor.

When state schools are "free," more people will apply. As more apply, selectivity will increase, as administrators chase higher U.S. News & World Report rankings. That will exclude students with lower credentials, who tend to be from more disadvantaged homes.

Finally, the law will hurt its recipients' future earnings. Students who receive free tuition for four years have to remain in New York state for four years after graduating or pay the money back. This means they won't be able to seize out-of-state opportunities during the crucial years when their career track is being formed. They'll be trapped in a state with one really expensive city and other regions where good jobs are scarce.

This is a really counterproductive law. We're all focused on Trump, but one of the reasons Trump was elected was that many of the people who try to use government to do good just haven't thought things through.

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David Brooks is a columnist for the New York Times.

Editorial on 04/21/2017

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