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News in brief

CEO position filled

at Northwest Health

Northwest Health has named Denten Park its chief executive officer.

Park moves into the health care system's leadership role after spending nine years as chief executive officer at Mountain View Regional Medical Center in Las Cruces, N.M. He replaces Sharif Omar, who had been CEO since August 2014 before leaving Northwest Health in April.

Park has more than 20 years of executive management experience at hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation centers. He earned his master's degree in business administration from New Mexico State and his bachelor's degree in business management and social business from Utah State.

Northwest Health has five hospitals, more than 540 physicians and 2,200 staff members across Northwest Arkansas.

-- Robbie Neiswanger

Panel supports team

as airport's lobbyist

The Ron Fuller Enterprises team of Ron Fuller and Melissa Moody won a recommendation Tuesday to be the new lobbyist for Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport/Adams Field.

The firm was selected by a unanimous vote of the Little Rock Municipal Airport Commission's lease and consultant selection committee after the committee heard presentations from Fuller and two other firms, Paschall Strategic Communications and the Little Rock law firm of Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard PLLC.

Fuller was the local subcontractor for the airport's outgoing lobbying firm of six years, Witt Global Partners, which was paid a $5,000 monthly retainer. Witt didn't pursue another contract with the airport.

Work by the Witt/Fuller combo included efforts to fight proposed legislation in 2017 that would have forced the commission to rename Clinton National.

The recommendation now goes to the commission for consideration at its regular monthly meeting next Tuesday.

-- Noel Oman

Gaining 1.02, index

grazes a record high

The Arkansas Index, a price-weighted index that tracks the largest public companies based in the state, reached a record high of 451.50 Tuesday before closing at 450.81, up 1.02.

Total volume for the index was 20.8 million shares.

"U.S. stocks limped higher as investors chew on news from the U.S.-North Korean meeting along with curiosity as to what the Federal Reserve plans for interest rates after its two-day meeting ends today," said Chris Harkins, managing director with Raymond James & Associates in Little Rock.

The index was developed by Bloomberg News and the Democrat-Gazette with a base value of 100 as of Dec. 30, 1997.

Business on 06/13/2018

Comments

skeptic1 says...

And how many mom and pop stores did they force out of business when they built their Made-in-China store? Sam is no doubt rolling in his grave at how his family has sullied his brand. Does anyone remember the commercials boasting that Walmart products were Made-in-America and their employees were all shareholders? Now they sell low quality low cost products from China and they keep their employees below full-time status so they don't have to pay benefits. Watch the documentary "The High Cost of Low Price," it will make you sick at how Walmart has destroyed communities and how they boast about it.

Posted 13 June 2017, 8:09 a.m. Suggest removal

hah406 says...

That is the way capitalism works. Given your conservative bent, I thought you would be all for how Walmart works.

Posted 13 June 2017, 9 a.m. Suggest removal

Olphart says...

There's a theme here that you always hear in Arkansas. ''Mr Sam" wouldn't like the way Walmart operates nowadays. I think Arkies love him cause he supposedly drove an old truck -- just like us!

Mr Sam died in 1992. Did Walmart start putting mom'n'pop stores out business only after his death? He knew what he was doing all along. If he were alive today, he'd approve of anything that grew the business and increased profits. Why, it's the American way. You can't have it both ways.

He might still be driving the old truck though. So what?

Posted 13 June 2017, 9:40 a.m. Suggest removal

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