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Weather makes Olympics too wintry

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Photographs by AP/ERIK JOHANSEN

A bundled up girl walks near Phoenix Snow Park at the Winter Olympics. Colder-than-normal temperatures and strong winds have caused problems for spectators and competitors.

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea -- The Winter Olympics are supposed to be cold, of course. Just maybe not THIS cold.

Wind and ice pellets left Olympic snowboarders simply trying to stay upright in conditions that many felt were unfit for competition, the best ski jumpers on the planet dealing with swirling gusts, and biathletes aiming to shoot straight.

All around the games, athletes and fans are dealing with conditions that have tested even the most seasoned winter sports veterans.

Low temperatures have hovered in the single digits, dipping below zero with unforgiving gusts whipping at 45 mph to make it feel much colder. Organizers have shuffled schedules, and shivering spectators left events early.

The raw air sent hundreds of fans to the exits Sunday when qualifying was called off after women's slopestyle devolved into a mess of mistakes, and Monday's final started 75 minutes late. Of the 50 runs, 41 ended with a fall or a rider essentially giving up. The temperature dropped to 3 with high winds.

American Jamie Anderson won the gold medal by watching most of her competitors struggle, and then completing a conservative run that paled in comparison to her winning performance at the X Games just two weeks ago.

"It has to be absolutely petrifying, terrifying, being up that high in the air, and having a gust 30 mph coming sideways at you," U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association CEO Tiger Shaw said

Many of the snowboarders didn't think they should have been out there.

"You're going up the chairlift and you see these little tornadoes," said Czech snowboarder Sarka Pancohova, who finished 16th, "and you're like, 'What is this?' "

At ski jumping, giant netting was set up to reduce the wind that can blow at three times the optimal velocity for the sport. Didn't help all that much, though: The men's normal hill final Saturday was pushed back repeatedly and eventually finished after midnight.

"It was unbelievably cold," said Japan's Noriaki Kasai, competing at his record eighth Olympics. "The noise of the wind at the top of the jump was incredible. I've never experienced anything like that on the World Cup circuit. I said to myself, 'Surely they are going to cancel this.' "

Alpine skiing still hasn't started at all, leaving stars like Mikaela Shiffrin of the U.S. and Aksel Lund Svindal of Norway waiting for their turn in the spotlight. Each of the first two races on the program -- the men's downhill Sunday, and the women's giant slalom Monday -- were called off hours before they were supposed to begin. Both of those have been moved to Thursday, when things are supposed to become slightly more manageable.

The forecast calls for more high winds today and Wednesday, although temperatures are expected to climb to 26.

"I am pretty sure that soon," men's race director Markus Waldner said with a wry smile, "we will have a race."

Until then, he and other officials are left trying to come up with contingency plans and ways to get the full 11-race Alpine program completed before the Olympics are scheduled to close Feb. 25.

As it is, logistical complications are real concerns.

Waldner pointed out that he needs to figure out a way to get three men's races -- the combined, downhill and super-G -- completed by Friday, because there is only one hotel right by the speed course at the Jeongseon Alpine Center. The male skiers need to vacate their rooms to make way for their female counterparts, whose speed events are supposed to begin Saturday.

"Now, it's getting tight," he said.

Even those attending indoor events have been tested. Long, cold waits for buses have left workers, media and fans complaining.

Sports on 02/13/2018

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